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20121101
20121130
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KPIX (CBS) 3
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
Nov 18, 2012 7:30pm EST
agents from ice, the u.s. immigration and customs enforcement agency, whose job, among other things, is to prevent contraband from moving across u.s. borders. the amount of cocaine and money the super cartel smuggled was incomprehensible, and it took authorities by surprise. u.s. ice agents first got a glimpse of what they were up against when they arrived here in september 2009, the sprawling pacific coast port of buenaventura, colombia. the agents got a tip to be on the lookout for cargo containers of fertilizer arriving from mexico. they were stunned by what they found. >> there it is! >> holy ( bleep ). >> logan: shrink-wrapped bundles of money. this one is $700,000 u.s. in $20 bills. as they searched through more containers, both here and in mexico, they found staggering amounts of cash. more and more money, $41 million in that first seizure alone. you'd never actually seen anything like it? >> luis sierra: no, we'd never seen containers full of cash. >> logan: luis sierra was directing the ice operation that day. he told us that, until then, tales of containers full of cash we
CBS
Nov 4, 2012 7:00pm PST
seats are up for grabs in the u.s. senate, which used to be known as the world's greatest deliberative body, a place where difficult issues were carefully considered and debated until a consensus or a compromise was reached. today, it's known more for deadlock, dysfunction, and political gamesmanship, a body unwilling or unable to resolve the major issues of the day-- jobs, deficits, taxes, and how to allocate $1.2 trillion in automatic budget cuts set to go into effect january 1. a number of respected senators have thrown up their hands and quit, and others are speaking out against an institution many think is broken. one powerful senator had this advice for the voters. >> tom coburn: the best thing that could happen is all of us lose and send some people up here who care more about the country than they do their political party or their position in politics. >> kroft: senator tom coburn of oklahoma is one of the most influential and conservative members of the senate. he's blocked hundreds of pieces of legislation that he thinks are a waste of money, but he is also one o
CBS
Nov 11, 2012 7:00pm PST
that? we were, but it turns out there are more than three million open jobs in the u.s. right now with as many as 500,000 of those in manufacturing. employers complain they can't qualified, skilled workers. how is that possible in this economy? that's our story tonight. >> come along with david mccullough when he goes along on our journey to paris before independence, a time of a new generation. >> they came here in order to improve themselves and to thereby improve their country. >> as for this generation of americans, america's favorite historian is less than enthusiastic. >> we are raising children in america today who by in large historically are ill it illiter. >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm lesley stahl. >> i'm morley safer. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm byron pitts. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42
CNBC
Nov 20, 2012 9:00pm EST
new iraqi army had been stolen from the ministry of defense by the very people the u.s. entrusted to run it. >> that's a lot of money. >> it's one of the biggest thefts in history, i think. >> most of the iraqi officials involved, including the former minister of defense, have skipped the country, but we found one of his deputies vacationing in paris. if you went back to baghdad, you'd be arrested. >> uh, no. nobody will arrest me. they will kill me. [ticking] [camera shutter snaps] >> these surveillance photos were taken by undercover police officers while they watched a team of seven south american thieves clean out an old navy store. >> shirts at $22.50, and they got the whole rack. >> when police moved in to make the arrest, they found enough merchandise to fill a room. all taken in less than an hour without anyone inside the store noticing a thing. [ticking] >> we have never seen a problem of this size and magnitude in world history. >> now hang on. in world history. >> there's more counterfeiting going on in china now than we've ever seen anywhere. >> name an american brand. an
CNBC
Nov 27, 2012 9:00pm EST
100 front companies. he's one of the richest and most violent godfathers, known to u.s. law enforcement as the john gotti of japan. but there was one thing goto's power and money couldn't buy him in his homeland. he had liver disease and desperately needed a transplant. culturally, the japanese don't believe in organ donation, so to get a new liver, he needed to come to the u.s. for a yakuza, that should have been a problem, says mike cox. he was the chief of immigration and customs at the u.s. embassy in tokyo. >> we want to be a welcoming country in the united states, but certainly, we don't want the yakuza coming to the united states. >> because they're criminals? >> they have extensive criminal histories here in japan. they are members of criminal organizations. for both of those reasons, they would be ineligible to enter the united states. >> how did he get around that? according to jake adelstein's reporting, which we confirmed, tadamasa goto made a deal with the fbi. he offered to become a rat and inform on his yakuza brothers. >> goto said, "here's the deal. i need t
CNBC
Nov 22, 2012 5:00pm EST
for your own survival. >> and what's wrong with that? [ticking] >> when the u.s. oil companies came here in the '40s and '50s, the americans moved into the area with their families and developed it to suit their tastes and their way of life. they created a replica of american suburbia. today you could be in the outskirts of houston or los angeles. it's almost like it's an enclave within saudi arabia. it's--different from the rest of the country. >> yes, that's true, because-- >> very different. it kept a lot of the american ways. >> yes, of course. >> but blocked off from the rest. >> they are good ways. there's nothing wrong with it. these were their excellent ways. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm morley safer. in this edition, we follow the flow of big oil from massive, mega billion dollar oil fields in saudi arabia to the u.s. where wall street refines the oil into a mega billion dollar commodity. we begin with a look back to 2008 when the price of oil, theoretically tied to supply and demand, suddenly became untethered. storage tanks were full, yet the price skyrocketed fr
CNBC
Nov 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
in the u.s., and those plants produce 130 million tons of waste called coal ash. it contains concentrations of mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic materials. and as lesley stahl first reported in 2009, when coal ash is dumped into wet ponds--and there are more than 500 of those across the country-- the result can have an enormous health risk on the people living in nearby communities. >> we get about 48%, nearly half of the electricity in this country from coal. >> jim roewer is one of the top lobbyists for the power industry. >> coal is going to be around for a long time. >> and we really can't get rid of coal. >> we shouldn't get rid of coal. >> well, should or shouldn't, we can't, and coal makes waste. would you say that the industry has done a good job of disposing of the coal ash waste? >> we can do better. >> does that mean no? >> well, we had a kingston spill. >> that's kingston, tennessee, where, in december 2008, a giant retention pool of coal ash buckled under the weight of five decades of waste. >> all the power lines have been knocked out. >> a billion gallons
CNBC
Nov 14, 2012 12:00am EST
4,000 bogus mortgage documents a day for major u.s. banks. and your previous experience in banking? >> none. [ticking] >> it started out as a mortgage crisis. then it slowly evolved into a credit crisis. now it's something entirely different and much more serious. >> this is a full-blown financial storm and one that comes around perhaps one every 50 or 100 years. this is the real thing. >> and much of what went wrong on wall street could be traced back to something called "credit default swaps." they were traded in a risky shadow market, and they were at the heart of the financial meltdown. [ticking] >> it has tentacles as wide as anything i've seen. i think, next to housing, this is the single most important issue in the united states and certainly the largest threat to the u.s. economy. >> meredith whitney was talking back in 2010 about a then- looming financial crisis involving state and local governments across the country. it was a debt crisis which some people believe could derail the recovery and require another big bailout package that no one in washington wants to talk abo
CNBC
Nov 4, 2012 11:00pm EST
, but anyone who thought the war between microsoft and the u.s. government was about to end didn't know bill gates. in the fall of 1999, the microsoft chairman sat down with charlie rose to talk about his company, his life, and how he felt about the judge's decision in the antitrust suit against his company. >> well, i had this kind of naive, youthful view that if you just ran your company and did great products that, you know, that's what you were supposed to focus on. >> and if you just took care of business, everything else would be all right. >> there's a lot of things you need to do, but i didn't think one of them was to look over your shoulder at an attack by your own government on your innovation. >> but the government says the trial was about protecting consumers. >> i think the proof is the consumers have been harmed and harmed in very substantial ways thus far. >> you're the man. [laughter] >> attorney david boies made the case against microsoft. >> microsoft is always free to innovate. what we're trying to do in this case is to preserve the freedom of other companies to
CNBC
Nov 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
largely stuck at the u.s. embassy. the japanese didn't think they needed the help. but the emergency was out of control, and the u.s. gave the japanese an ominous private warning. >> that if, you know, we don't expand the efforts, we'll require heroic work done that could be, you know, quite devastating for the workers. >> what do we mean by that? >> that means they could very well lose their lives. >> an official with the u.s. government told the japanese that "your people are gonna have to die save that plant unless you let us help you." >> yes. >> at one point during the week, the hazard was so great, the japanese took all but about 70 workers out of the plant. their problem is water. the systems that keep the radioactive fuel rods cool failed. the rods are partially melting, releasing radiation. and it's not just the reactors. there are also used fuel rods, essentially nuclear waste, stored in pools nearby. they're also losing water, and american experts fear that one of these pools is already dry. nesheiwat told us the danger is multiplied because the reactors are so c
CNBC
Nov 11, 2012 11:00pm EST
financial crash of 2008 pushed the u.s. economy to the brink of collapse. in its aftermath, some of the country's biggest banks received very big bailouts while large numbers of small local banks failed. this edition features a unique inside look at the seizure of a failed bank and a rare interview with one of the men at the center of the 2008 economic crisis and the recovery plan that has followed, the chairman of the board of governors of the federal reserve system, ben bernanke. plus, morley safer asks, "can america afford the lincoln penny?" well, we begin with bernanke. after the crash of '08, bernanke invoked emergency powers, and with unprecedented aggressiveness, he's thrown more than $1 trillion at the crisis. the words of any fed chairman cause fortunes to rise and fall, and so by tradition, chairmen of the fed do not do interviews. that is, until march of 2009 when ben bernanke sat down with scott pelley. >> mr. chairman, i'm gonna start with a question that everyone wants me to ask. when does this end? >> it depends a lot on the financial system. the lesson of history is tha
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)